Religion and climate change

On the Greenie watch blog, this story appeared: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-faith/wp/2013/11/12/super-typhoon-haiyan-suffering-and-the-sin-of-climate-change-denial/

Curious, I checked Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Katrina:

http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2008/04/23/22152/hagee-katrina-mccain/

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2012/11/14/1161717/-New-Apostolic-Reformation-leaders-LAUGH-about-destruction-wrought-by-Hurricane-Sandy

I learned two things:  (1)Politics and religion can be anything but caring and compassionate and (2) all the research into climate change is a waste.  Researchers need to be sitting in church to find out what God is up to this week.

It fascinates me that both sides will often endorse theories on God when it agrees with their viewpoint.  I have read several instances where churches endorsing climate change are hailed as visionary by the climate change advocates.  The exact same individuals celebrating this climate endorsement condemn views from the church on homosexuality.  One supposes you could claim this results due to removal of outlying data points, but that would be stretch.

All of this invoking of “God is on our side” moves the debate to the religious arena, which I find advocates embrace when it’s to their benefit, pulling the discussion out of science.  One of the criticisms of climate change is the religious nature of their beliefs–they often seem to take ideology from their “supreme beings” (peer-reviewed researchers) and not question any of it.  This leads to claims that climate change is faith based.  I cannot see how claiming “God is on our side” can do anything other than further reinforce questioner’s beliefs that climate change is about winning the public over, not about actual scientific data.

Much like the claims of conspiracy ideation on the part of questioners,  there exists a real possibility of further claims of religious ideation on the part of climate change advocates if articles invoking God’s approval continue to pop up.  Perhaps more damaging is the fact that advocates may be willing to grab onto anyone who supports their cause, with or without reason.  This further weakens their claims of science being reason for believing in climate change.

(Note:  I am not saying the using “God is on our side” means climate change is wrong.   The validity of the climate change theory is based entirely on the data.  However, climate change advocates often try to say/imply that people who believe in conspiracies and are skeptics proves skeptics are wrong because of the conspiracy beliefs.  The same tainting of the argument can certainly be achieved using “God is on our side” and climate change advocates.)

Additional note:  Someone asked me if the relief effort is carbon neutral?  My guess is no, it’s not.  Did all the believers in climate change turn off their lights and park their SUV’s to compensate for the fuel used in delivering supplies using multiple Osprey helicopters?  Seems unlikely.  Will God then send another hurricane to punish us for using too much fossil fuel in the relief effort?  Who knows?

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Scientific badger

Beware the Superlative

WtD is on a rant that Hurricane Hayian is “proof” of climate change.  It’s the storm of the century, complete and utter devastation and irrefutably caused by climate change.  First, let’s note that NBC World News has reported a death toll closer to 2000 or 2500, not 10,000 as was the original report.   Yes, any loss of life is sad and we feel for those who lose their homes and loved ones.  The scientist responds with new ways to build homes that are more resistant to hurricane damage.  The compassionate send relief supplies.  The politically motivated, use anyone and anything to promote our cause persons hold up the dead as proof of their beliefs.  Using the dead to push and agenda.  WtD seems to see nothing wrong with this.   Using people is nothing new to the climate change agenda–I’m sure we’ll see using and abusing of victims of any natural event far into the future in an attempt to gather more believers.

The title “beware the superlative” refers to the media and climate change people saying “super storm”, strongest winds, worst ever devastation.   Somewhere along the line, they are hoping your are not bright enough to realize that the previous record holder for winds was “the worst, the strongest”.  From stormfacts.net:

Hurricane Allen (July/August of 1980) was one of the strongest hurricanes to ever form in the Atlantic Basin. Allen reached Category 5 status three different times and is one of only two hurricanes to ever have winds reach in excess of 190 mph (the other being Hurricane Camille of 1969). Allen was the earliest Category 5 hurricane on record (reached Category 5 status on August 5th) until 2005’s Hurricane Emily (reached Category 5 status on July 16th). Allen made landfall north of Brownsville, Texas on August 9th as a Category 3 storm…  (my emphasis)

Every single record broken after the original record was set is “the worst, the strongest, the baddest”.  Superlatives do not indicate causality, and record-breaking does not prove anything.  Records are set every day and broken the following one.  Superlatives fool people into believing things are getting worse or better when in reality, it may be the exact opposite.

Beware the Superlative–it’s there to fool you into not thinking.  Think.

Scientific badger

Scientific badger

RIP Science

Today we announce the death of science.  While many believed science would be destroyed by the climate change myth and it’s associated politicalization of science, death actually occurred due to the allure of television.  Graduates in the medical field, in an attempt to make themselves popular and loved, crossed over and stabbed science to death today with the appearance of James Van Praagh on “The Doctors”.  In an ironic turn, the medium may actually be able to speak to the deceased field and let us know how it felt about it’s own death.  

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